Nov 23rd & Pass The Trust Test

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

Do you know the joy of selfless giving and generous love for others? True love doesn’t calculate – it spends lavishly! Jesus drove this point home to his disciples while sitting in the temple and observing people offering their tithes. Jesus praised a poor widow who gave the smallest of coins in contrast with the rich who gave greater sums. How can someone in poverty give more than someone who has ample means? Jesus’ answer is very simple – love is more precious than gold or wealth!

Love grows with gratitude and generous giving
Jesus taught that real giving must come from the heart. A gift that is given with a grudge or for display loses its value. But a gift given out of love, with a spirit of generosity and sacrifice, is precious. The amount or size of the gift doesn’t matter as much as the cost to the giver. The poor widow could have kept one of her coins, but instead she recklessly gave away all she had! Jesus praised someone who gave barely a penny – how insignificant a sum – because it was everything she had, her whole living.

Nothing given in love is worthless
What we have to offer may look very small and not worth much, but if we put all we have at the Lord’s disposal, no matter how insignificant it may seem, then God can do with it and with us what is beyond our reckoning. Do you give out of love and gratitude for what God has already given to you?

“Lord Jesus, your love knows no bounds and you give without measure. All that I have comes from you. May I give freely and generously in gratitude for all that you have given to me. Take my life and all that I possess – my gifts, talents, time and resources – and use them as you see fit for your glory.”

 

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

PASS THE TRUST TEST

“Test your servants.” —Daniel 1:12

The four young Israelite men asked their master to test their faith (Dn 1:12). Likewise, the poor widow in the Gospel reading asked God to test her faith by giving the Lord all her money (Lk 21:4). During the testing they gave God their all, trusted Him in the present moment, and placed their futures in His hands.

Jesus teaches us that our heavenly Father’s plan is to provide on a “daily bread” basis (Mt 6:11). Many try to provide for a better tomorrow by storing up treasures, only to have that future plundered by the collapse of financial markets, the whims of world governments, or the ravages of thieves, natural disasters, or divorce. “Now is the acceptable time,” not tomorrow (see 2 Cor 6:2). Tomorrow may never happen (see Lk 12:19-20Jas 4:13-14).

“Stop worrying, then, over questions like, ‘What are we to eat, or what are we to drink, or what are we to wear?’…Your heavenly Father knows all that you need. Seek first His kingship over you, His way of holiness, and all these things will be given you besides” (Mt 6:31, 32-33).

Don’t plan for tomorrow using today’s faith. Your plans probably won’t factor in the great faith God plans to provide tomorrow. “Test yourselves to see whether you are living in faith; examine yourselves” (2 Cor 13:5). Trust in God today, and pass the trust test.

Prayer: Father, help me not to harden my heart today by being overwhelmed with the seeming burdens of the future (Ps 95:7-8). Promise: “Blessed is Your holy and glorious name, praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.” —Dn 3:52 Praise: St. Columban said “It is [Peter’s] chair which makes [Rome] great and glorious.”   (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 22nd & “Your Kingdom Come”

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

Do you recognize that the Lord Jesus have been given all authority and power to reign over heaven and earth? Jesus was crucified for his claim to be the Messiah King (John 18:37) who would rule not only over his people Israel but ultimately over all the nations as well (Daniel 7:13-14).

God is King and Ruler over all
What is the significance or meaning of Jesus’ kingship for us? Kingship today seems antiquated, especially in democratic societies where everyone is treated equal and free. God at first did not want to give his people Israel a king. Why? Because God alone was their King and they needed no other. Nonetheless, God relented and promised his people that through David’s line he would establish a Ruler and a Kingdom that would last for eternity (Psalm 89:29).

The Jews understood that the Messiah (“Anointed One”) would come as God’s anointed King to restore paradise and establish God’s reign of everlasting peace for them. They wanted a Messianic King who would free them from strife and division and from foreign oppression. Many had high hopes that Jesus would be the Messiah and Ruler for Israel. Little did they understand what kind of kingship Jesus claimed to possess.

Jesus’ claim to kingship
Jesus came to deliver his people, and the whole world, from the worst kind of tyranny possible – from bondage to sin, condemnation and death, and to free us from Satan’s kingdom of deception, oppression, and destruction. Jesus came to conquer hearts and souls for an unshakeable kingdom – a kingdom ruled not by force or fear – but by the power of God’s righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit (Romans 14:17).

When Satan tempted Jesus during his forty day fast in the wilderness, he offered Jesus all the kingdoms of the world (Matthew 4:8-9) Jesus knew that the world was in Satan’s power. And this was precisely why Jesus came – to overthrow Satan’s power and deception over the earth. Jesus knew that the way to victory was through submission to his Father’s will and strategy for overcoming sin and Satan in the world. The Father sent his only begotten Son into the world, not to condemn it, but to save it through the atoning sacrifice which Jesus would make for us through the shedding of his blood on the cross of Calvary.

As Jesus was dying on the cross, he was mocked for his claim to kingship. Nonetheless, he died not only as King of the Jews, but King of all the nations as well. His victory over the power of sin, Satan, and the world, was accomplished through his death on the cross and his resurrection. Jesus exchanged a throne of glory for a cross of shame to restore us from slavery to sin to glory with God as his adopted sons and daughters. In the Book of Revelations Jesus is called King of kings and Lord and lords(Revelations 19:16).  Do you recognize Jesus Christ as your King and Lord?

Which ruler and kingdom will you serve?
The Scriptures tell us that there are ultimately only two kingdoms in this world which are opposed to one another – the kingdom of light and the kingdom of darkness. Each kingdom is ruled by one lord or master  – the Lord Jesus Christ who is the true “Light of the World” – or the false messiah and ruler who is called the “anti-Christ” and an “angel of light” who rules by lies and deception.

If we serve the Lord Jesus Christ he will open our eyes to the light of his truth and guide us on the course that leads to our true homeland and security with God. If we follow the course which is set by the world – a world which is opposed to Christ and blinded by Satan – then we will discover that sin, pride, and greed will lead us down a path of destruction, division, and death rather than life, community, and freedom.

Which kingdom will you serve – today and for all eternity? The world which passes away or God’s kingdom which lasts for all time? If we accept Jesus Christ as Lord and King we become citizens of an everlasting kingdom which is governed by God’s righteousness, peace, and love. Is your life submitted to the Lordship of Jesus Christ?

“Lord Jesus Christ, you are my King and there is no other. Be the Lord and Master of my heart, mind, body, and soul. May I always seek to do your will and to serve your kingdom above all else.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

“YOUR KINGDOM COME” (Mt 6:10)

“Anyone committed to the truth hears My voice.” —John 18:37

Decades ago, our young family gathered with several other young Catholic families and their small children in one family’s large log cabin. It was a pleasant party until I happened to notice the host and another young father sitting in a far corner pulling out a recreational drug. They pulled out a cigarette lighter and flicked it into flame. Immediately in my mind, the verse reverberated over and over: “My kingdom does not belong to this world” (Jn 18:36). I knew we had to live as subjects of Jesus the King, at all times, in all occasions. Quickly, I gathered up my family and we left the party to return home.

There is a battle raging between two kingdoms. The kingdom of darkness, led by Satan, the ruler of this age (2 Cor 4:4), and the Kingdom of God, led by King Jesus, “Ruler of the kings of earth” (Rv 1:5), battle constantly for our loyalty. There is no neutral ground in this battle. We cannot serve two masters (see Mt 6:24). We can give our loyalty to only one of the kingdoms. We either live as obedient, loving subjects of Christ the King or we rebel against Him. King Jesus embraced lowliness. If we are truly His obedient, loving subjects, we must do the same.

Prayer:  All hail, King Jesus! “Your kingdom come” (Mt 6:10). I will seek first Your kingdom (Mt 6:33) every moment of my life. Promise: “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the One Who is and Who was and Who is to come, the Almighty!” —Rv 1:8 Praise: Praise Jesus, the Lamb Who sits upon the throne!   (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 21st & Our Unworthiness In His Worthiness

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

Is your life earth-bound or heaven-bound? The Sadducees had one big problem – they could not conceive of heaven beyond what they could see with their naked eyes! Aren’t we often like them? We don’t recognize spiritual realities because we try to make heaven into an earthly image. The Sadducees came to Jesus with a test question to make the resurrection look ridiculous. The Sadducees, unlike the Pharisees, did not believe in immortality, nor in angels or evil spirits. Their religion was literally grounded in an earthly image of heaven.

The Scriptures give witness – we will rise again to immortal life
Jesus retorts by dealing with the fact of the resurrection. The scriptures give proof of it. In Exodus 3:6, when God manifests his presence to Moses in the burning bush, the Lord tells him that he isthe God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. He shows that the patriarchs who died hundreds of years previously were still alive in God. Jesus defeats their arguments by showing that God is a living God of a living people. God was the friend of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob when they lived. That friendship could not cease with death. As Psalm 73:23-24 states: “I am continually with you; you hold my right hand. You guide me with your counsel, and afterward you will receive me to glory.” 

The ultimate proof of the resurrection is the Lord Jesus and his victory over death when he rose from the tomb. Before Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, he exclaimed:  “I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and whoever lives and believes in me shall never die.  Do you believe this?” (John 11:25). Jesus asks us the same question. Do you believe in the resurrection and in the promise of eternal life with God?

Jesus came to restore Paradise and everlasting life for us
The Holy Spirit reveals to us the eternal truths of God’s unending love and the life he desires to share with us for all eternity. Paul the Apostle, quoting from the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 64:4; 65:17) states: “What no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man conceived, what God has prepared for those who love him,” God has revealed to us through the Spirit (1 Corinthians 2:9-10). The promise of paradise – heavenly bliss and unending life with an all-loving God – is beyond human reckoning. We have only begun to taste the first-fruits! Do you live now in the joy and hope of the life of the age to come?

“May the Lord Jesus put his hands on our eyes also, for then we too shall begin to look not at what is seen but at what is not seen. May he open the eyes that are concerned not with the present but with what is yet to come, may he unseal the heart’s vision, that we may gaze on God in the Spirit, through the same Lord, Jesus Christ, whose glory and power will endure throughout the unending succession of ages.” (Prayer of Origen, 185-254 AD)

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

OUR UNWORTHINESS IN HIS WORTHINESS

“The children of this age marry and are given in marriage, but those judged worthy of a place in the age to come and of resurrection from the dead do not.” —Luke 20:34-35

Will you be “judged worthy of a place in the age to come and of resurrection from the dead”? (Lk 20:35) Is there anything you have done or can do which makes you worthy to be raised from the dead? Obviously, no one is worthy to be raised from the dead except Jesus, the Lamb of God, the Resurrection and the Life (Jn 11:25). All the angels cry out at God’s throne: “Worthy is the Lamb That was slain to receive power and riches, wisdom and strength, honor and glory and praise!” (Rv 5:12)

We have no righteousness and worthiness of our own (Phil 3:9). However, we have been baptized into Christ (Rm 6:3), and in Jesus we are in His worthiness and will be judged worthy of resurrection from the dead and eternal life. The Church has taught us to pray when we receive Holy Communion that we are not worthy to have Jesus come under our roof (see Mt 8:8). We will never be worthy to receive Jesus. Nevertheless, when we receive Him and are in Him (Jn 6:56), we renew our baptismal covenant with Him and in our unworthiness, we receive worthiness.

“Who is worthy?” (Rv 5:2) “O Lord our God, You are worthy” (Rv 4:11). “Worthy is the Lamb” (Rv 5:12).

Prayer: Jesus, the slain Lamb of God, “the Resurrection and the Life,” my Savior, my Lord, my God, my Worthiness… Promise: “Moses in the passage about the bush showed that the dead rise again when he called the Lord the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. God is not the God of the dead but of the living. All are alive for Him.” —Lk 20:37-38 Praise: Sts. Ann and Joachim believed that God would work His plan through their daughter. They expressed their belief by presenting their daughter Mary to be raised in the Temple at the age of three.
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 20th & Purity

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

Why did Jesus drive out the money changers in the temple at Jerusalem? Was he upset with their greediness? This is the only incident in the Gospels where we see Jesus using physical force. Jesus went to Jerusalem, knowing he would meet certain death on the cross, but victory as well for our sake. His act of judgment in the temple is meant to be a prophetic sign and warning to the people that God takes our worship very seriously.

Jesus honors the Father’s house of prayer by cleansing it of unholy practices
In this incident we see Jesus’ startling and swift action in cleansing the temple of those who were using it to exploit the worshipers of God. The money changers took advantage of the poor and forced them to pay many times more than was right – in the house of God no less! Their robbery of the poor was not only dishonoring to God but unjust toward their neighbor.

The people were hungry for the word of God
In justification for his audacious action Jesus quotes from the prophets Isaiah (Isaiah 56:7) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 7:11). His act of judgment aims to purify the worship of God’s people and to discipline their erring ways. Despite the objections of the religious leaders, no doubt because Jesus was usurping their authority in the house of God, the people who listened to Jesus teaching daily in the temple regarded him with great awe and respect. Luke tells us that “they hung upon Jesus’ words” (Luke 19:48)How hungry are you for God’s word?

The Lord wants to share his holiness with us
If we approach God’s word with a humble attentive heart and with a willingness to be taught by the Lord, then we are in a good place to allow God’s word to change and transform us in the likeness of Christ. The Lord wants to teach us his ways so that we may grow in holiness. The Lord both instructs and disciplines us in love to lead us from the error of our sinful ways to his truth and justice. “God disciplines us for our good, that we may share in his holiness” (Hebrews 12:10). The Lord calls us to be a holy people who worship him with reverence and gratitude for his great mercy and kindness towards us. Do you allow God’s word to transform you in his way of love and holiness?

“Lord Jesus, you open wide the door of your house and you bid us to enter confidently that we may worship you in spirit and truth. Help me to draw near to you with gratitude and joy for your great mercy. May I always revere your word and give you acceptable praise and worship.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

PURITY

Jesus “entered the temple and began ejecting the traders.” —Luke 19:45

Jesus has made it clear that He wants His temple purified (see 1 Mc 4:36). Jesus commands us to be pure, even “as He is pure” (1 Jn 3:3). Jesus is purifying His Church “in the bath of water by the power of the word, to present to Himself a glorious church, holy and immaculate, without stain or wrinkle or anything of that sort” (Eph 5:26-27). “By obedience to the truth,” we can purify ourselves “for a genuine love” of our brothers and sisters (1 Pt 1:22). The Lord has promised us “a fountain to purify from sin and uncleanness” (Zec 13:1).

This fountain of purification is our Baptism into Jesus (Rm 6:3) in which we have stripped “off the carnal body completely” (Col 2:11). If we live our Baptism by being holy in every aspect of our conduct (1 Pt 1:15), we are pure. Even if we have defiled ourselves through sin after our Baptism, we can be purified by repentance, especially by accepting God’s mercy through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Therefore, “since we have these promises, beloved, let us purify ourselves from every defilement of flesh and spirit, and in the fear of God strive to fulfill our consecration perfectly” (2 Cor 7:1).

Prayer: Father, may I want to be pure more than a person with cancer wants to be free of all cancerous cells. Promise: “All the people prostrated themselves and adored and praised Heaven, who had given them success.” —1 Mc 4:55 Praise: John found the best way to deal with a difficult person and situation was to frequent the Sacrament of Reconciliation.
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 19th & Will You Ever Deny Him?

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

What enables us to live in peace and harmony with our families, neighbors, local communities, and the wider community of peoples and nations? The Father in heaven sent his only begotten Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, to reconcile us with God and to unite us with one another in a bond of peace and mutual love.

Jesus’ earthly ministry centers and culminates in Jerusalem, which Scripture describes as the holy city, the throne of the Lord (Jeremiah 3:17);and the place which God chose for his name to dwell there (1Kings 11:13; 2 Kings 21:4; 2 Kings 23:27); and the holy mountain upon which God has set his king (Psalm 2:6). Jerusalem derives its name from the word “salem”which mean “peace”. The temple in Jerusalem was a constant reminder to the people of God’s presence with them.

Tears of mourning and sorrow over sin and refusal to believe in God
When Jesus approached Jerusalem and saw the multitude of homes surrounding the holy temple, he wept over it because it inhabitants did not “know the things that make for peace” (Luke 19:42). As he poured out his heart to the Father in heaven, Jesus shed tears of sorrow, grief, and mourning for his people. He knew that he would soon pour out his blood for the people of Jerusalem and for the whole world as well.

Why does Jesus weep and lament over the city of Jerusalem? Throughout its history, many of the rulers and inhabitants – because of their pride and unbelief – had rejected the prophets who spoke in the name of the Lord. Now they refuse to listen to Jesus who comes as their Messiah – whom God has anointed to be their Savior and Prince of Peace (Isaiah 9:6).

Jesus is our only hope – the only one who can save us and the world
Jesus’ entrance into Jerusalem was a gracious visitation of God’s anointed Son and King to his holy city. Jerusalem’s lack of faith and rejection of the Messiah, however, leads to its eventual downfall and destruction by the Romans in 70 A.D. Jesus’ lamentation and prophecy echoes the lamentation of Jeremiah who prophesied the first destruction of Jerusalem and its temple. Jeremiah’s prayer of lamentation offered a prophetic word of hope, deliverance, and restoration:

“But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, his mercies are new every morning …For the Lord will not cast off for ever, but, though he cause grief, he will have compassion according to the abundance of his steadfast love for he does not willingly afflict or grieve the sons of men” (Lamentations 3:21-22, 31-32).

Jesus is the hope of the world because he is the only one who can truly reconcile us with God and with one another. Through his death and resurrection Jesus breaks down the walls of hostility and division by reconciling us with God. He gives us his Holy Spirit both to purify us and restore us as a holy people of God. Through Jesus Christ we become living temples of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19).  God has visited his people in the past and he continues to visit us through the gift and working of his Holy Spirit. Do you recognize God’s gracious visitation of healing and restoration today?

God judges, pardons, heals, and restores us to new life
When God visits his people he comes to establish peace and justice by rooting out our enemies – the world(which stands in opposition to God), the flesh (our own sinful cravings and inordinate desires), and the devil (who is Satan, the father of lies and a murderer from the beginning – John 8:44) who enslave us to fear and pride, rebellion and hatred, envy and covetousness, strife and violence, and every form of evil and wrong-doing. That is why God both judges and purifies his people – to lead us from our sinful ways to his way of justice, peace, love, and holiness. God actively works among his people to teach us his ways and to save us from the destruction of our own pride and sin and from Satan’s snares and lies.

Are God’s judgments unjust or unloving? Scripture tells us that “when God’s judgments are revealed in the earth, the inhabitants of the world learn righteousness” (Isaiah 26:9). To pronounce judgment on sin is much less harsh than what will happen if those who sin are not warned to repent. The Lord in his mercy gives us grace and time to turn away from sin, but that time is right now. If we delay, even for a moment, we may discover that grace has passed us by and our time is up. Do you accept the grace to turn away from sin and to walk in God’s way of peace and holiness?

“Lord Jesus, you have visited and redeemed your people. May I not miss the grace of your visitation today as you move to bring your people into greater righteousness and holiness of life. Purify my heart and mind that I may I understand your ways and conform my life more fully to your will.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

WILL YOU EVER DENY HIM?

“The officers of the king in charge of enforcing the apostasy came to the city.” —1 Maccabees 2:15

The Seleucid king tried to enforce an apostasy on the Jews. Roman emperors repeatedly tried to enforce apostasies on the early Christians. This continues to happen as Chinese Communists oppress Christians, terrorists brutalize Christians in several other nations, and secular humanists express their intolerance of Christians in the Western world. These many attempts to enforce apostasies will culminate in the mass apostasy led by the antichrist at the end of the world (2 Thes 2:3ff).

We will not deny Christ if we are like Mattathias. He refused to be manipulated “in the slightest degree” by threats and bribes (1 Mc 2:22). He courageously “answered in a loud voice” that he would not be influenced by popular opinion (1 Mc 2:19). Mattathias and his whole family were united in their resolve to keep the covenant with the Lord (1 Mc 2:20). Mattathias was zealous (1 Mc 2:24) and willing to leave behind all his possessions in order “to live according to righteousness” (1 Mc 2:28-29).

Are you “apostasy-proof”? Will you withstand the pressure, or will you fold? Are you like Mattathias? Would you leave your lifestyle behind to save your life in Christ?

Prayer: Father, I give up my life for Jesus (Lk 9:24). Promise: “Offer to God praise as your sacrifice and fulfill your vows to the Most High; then call upon Me in time of distress; I will rescue you, and you shall glorify Me.” —Ps 50:14-15 Praise: Mark finally accepted the Church’s teaching against contraception and had his vasectomy reversed.
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 18th & The Only Way To Defeat Terrorism

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

How does God establish his kingdom here on the earth? The Jews in Jesus’ time had a heightened sense that the Messiah would appear soon to usher in the kingdom of God’s justice, love, and peace on the earth (Isaiah 11:1-9). Jesus, in fact, spoke in messianic terms of the coming reign of God. Perhaps his entry into Jerusalem would bring about such a change and overthrow of Roman domination.

Parable of the talents
Jesus speaks to their longing for a new kingdom in the parable of a nobleman who went away to receive a kingdom. The parable reveals something important about how God works his plan and purpose with the human race. The parable speaks first of the king’s trust in his subjects. While he goes away he leaves them with his money to use as they think best. While there were no strings attached, this was obviously a test to see if the Master’s workers would be industrious and reliable in their use of the money entrusted to them. The master rewards those who are industrious and faithful and he punishes those who sit by idly and who do nothing with his money.

The essence of the parable seems to lie in the servants’ conception of responsibility. Each servant entrusted with the master’s money was faithful up to a certain point. The servant who buried the master’s money was irresponsible. One can bury seeds in the ground and expect them to become productive because they obey natural laws. Coins, however, do not obey natural laws. They obey economic laws and become productive in circulation. The master expected his servants to be productive in the use of his money.

The Lord rewards those who faithfully use their gifts and talents for doing good by giving them more
What do coins and the law of economics have to do with the kingdom of God? The Lord entrusts the subjects of his kingdom with gifts and graces and he gives his subjects the freedom to use them as they think best. With each gift and talent, God gives sufficient means (grace and wisdom) for using them in a fitting way. As the parable of the talents shows, God abhors indifference and an attitude that says it’s not worth trying. God honors those who use their talents and gifts for doing good. Those who are faithful with even a little are entrusted with more! But those who neglect or squander what God has entrusted to them will lose what they have.

There is an important lesson here for us. No one can stand still for long in the Christian life. We either get more or we lose what we have. We either advance towards God or we slip back. Do you seek to serve God with the gifts, talents, and graces he has given to you?

The Lord Jesus offers us a kingdom of justice, love, and peace and he calls us to live as citizens of this kingdom where he rules as Lord and Master. Through his atoning death on the cross and through his resurrection victory, Jesus frees us from a kingdom of darkness where sin and Satan reign. Through the power of the Holy Spirit the Lord gives us freedom to live as his servants and to lay down our lives in loving service of our neighbors (Galatians 5:1,13).

The Lord expects us to be good stewards of the gifts and graces he gives us
The Lord entrusts us with his gifts and graces and he gives us freedom to use them as we think best. With each gift and talent, the Lord gives sufficient grace and strength for using them in a fitting way. As the parable of the talents shows, God abhors indifference and an attitude that says it’s not worth trying. God honors those who use their talents and gifts for doing good. Those who are faithful with even a little are entrusted with more! But those who neglect or squander what God has entrusted to them will lose what they have. There is an important lesson here for us. No one can stand still for long in the Christian life. We either get more or we lose what we have. We either advance towards God or we slip back. Do you trust in God’s grace to make good use of the gifts and talents he has given you?

“Lord Jesus, be the ruler of my heart and mind and the master of my home and goods. Fill me with a generous and wise spirit that I may use the gifts, talents, time, and resources you give me for your glory and your kingdom.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

THE ONLY WAY TO DEFEAT TERRORISM

“The mother…saw her seven sons perish in a single day, yet bore it courageously because of her hope in the Lord.” —2 Maccabees 7:20

The Seleucids who persecuted the Jewish people at the time of the Maccabean revolt were terrorists. They did not just kill their enemies but did it in such a way as to try to intimidate them. For example, they did not just kill seven Jewish brothers but scalped, dismembered, and fried them one by one, while forcing the remaining brothers and their mother to watch every brutal act. The Seleucids planned that the mother’s anguish would be used to manipulate her sons into becoming traitors to their faith or that they would at least break the spirit of the mother and the Jewish nation by their terrorism.

However, the terrorists’ psychological warfare backfired on them. The mother’s relationship with the Lord and with her sons was so strong that she did not crack under pressure. She strengthened her sons to die heroic deaths, and she followed them in martyrdom. Her faith and her family’s faith was so strong that it defeated the terrorists. Contrary to what many believe, terrorism is not defeated by military might. Because terrorism is demonic, it cannot be defeated by merely human means. It can be defeated only by faith in Jesus, especially by holy families of faith (Mt 17:20-21). Therefore, we must become holy faith-filled disciples of Jesus, or we will be helpless, intimidated, manipulated victims of terrorists.

Prayer: Father, I reject the spirit of fear and accept the Holy Spirit (see 2 Tm 1:6-7Rm 8:15). Promise: “He, in His mercy, will give you back both breath and life.” —2 Mc 7:23  Praise: St. Paul rejoiced when the gospel of Christ spread to others, even when it increased His suffering (Phil 1:17-18).
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 17th & Die And Let Live

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

What would you do if Jesus knocked on your door and said, “I must stay at your home today”? Would you be excited or embarrassed? Jesus often “dropped-in” at unexpected times and he often visited the “uninvited” – the poor, the lame, and even public sinners like Zacchaeus, the tax collector! Tax collectors were despised and treated as outcasts, no doubt because they over-charged people and accumulated great wealth at the expense of others.

Zacchaeus was a chief tax collector and was much hated by all the people. Why would Jesus single him out for the honor of staying at his home? Zacchaeus needed God’s merciful love and forgiveness. In his encounter with Jesus he found more than he imagined possible. He shows the depth of his repentance by deciding to give half of his goods to the poor and to use the other half for making restitution for fraud. Zacchaeus’ testimony included more than words. His change of heart resulted in a change of life, a change that the whole community could experience as genuine.

Faith welcomes Christ in our heart and home
Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430 AD) urges us to climb the sycamore tree like Zacchaeus that we might see Jesus and embrace his cross for our lives:

Zacchaeus climbed away from the crowd and saw Jesus without the crowd getting in his way. The crowd laughs at the lowly, to people walking the way of humility, who leave the wrongs they suffer in God’s hands and do not insist on getting back at their enemies. The crowd laughs at the lowly and says, ‘You helpless, miserable clod, you cannot even stick up for yourself and get back what is your own.’ The crowd gets in the way and prevents Jesus from being seen. The crowd boasts and crows when it is able to get back what it owns. It blocks the sight of the one who said as he hung on the cross, ‘Father, forgive them, because they do not know what they are doing…He ignored the crowd that was getting in his way. He instead climbed a sycamore tree, a tree of ‘silly fruit.’ As the apostle says, ‘We preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block indeed to the Jews, [now notice the sycamore] but folly to the Gentiles.’Finally, the wise people of this world laugh at us about the cross of Christ and say, ‘“What sort of minds do you people have, who worship a crucified God?’ What sort of minds do we have? They are certainly not your kind of mind. ‘The wisdom of this world is folly with God.’ No, we do not have your kind of mind. You call our minds foolish. Say what you like, but for our part, let us climb the sycamore tree and see Jesus. The reason you cannot see Jesus is that you are ashamed to climb the sycamore tree.

Let Zacchaeus grasp the sycamore tree, and let the humble person climb the cross. That is little enough, merely to climb it. We must not be ashamed of the cross of Christ, but we must fix it on our foreheads, where the seat of shame is. Above where all our blushes show is the place we must firmly fix that for which we should never blush. As for you, I rather think you make fun of the sycamore, and yet that is what has enabled me to see Jesus. You make fun of the sycamore, because you are just a person, but ‘the foolishness of God is wiser than men.’[Sermon 174.3.]

The Lord Jesus is always ready to make his home with each one of us. Do you make room for him in your heart and in every area of your life?

“Lord Jesus, come and stay with me. Fill my life with your peace, my home with your presence, and my heart with your praise. Help me to show kindness, mercy, and goodness to all, even to those who cause me ill-will or harm.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

DIE AND LET LIVE

“I will leave to the young a noble example of how to die willingly and generously for the revered and holy laws.” —2 Maccabees 6:28

Jesus said: “Whoever loses His life for My sake will save it” (Lk 9:24). “Unless a grain of wheat falls to the earth and dies, it remains just a grain of wheat. But if it dies, it produces much fruit” (Jn 12:24). Eleazar gave a fabulous example to young people of how to live and die for the Lord (2 Mc 6:31). In the very next chapter of 2 Maccabees, seven young men were brutally tortured and martyred for their faith in God. Quite possibly these young men had heard the story of Eleazar’s faithfulness and courage under pressure and were inspired by his example. These martrys bore great fruit, as their shed blood was the seed that led to the renewal of the faith of Israel in the times of the Maccabees.

“None of us lives as his own master and none of us dies as his own master. While we live we are responsible to the Lord, and when we die we die as His servants. Both in life and death we are the Lord’s” (Rm 14:7-8). When we die as a member of the Body of Christ, our dying can bring the life of Jesus to the world (see 2 Cor 4:11-12). We pray frequently that the Blessed Virgin Mary would pray for us “now and at the hour of our death.” It might be that you may lead many more people to the Lord Jesus by the courageous, trusting manner of your death than by your holy and faithful life. Be an Eleazar. May your life and death be “a noble example” to all who hear of you (2 Mc 6:28).

Prayer: Father, “to me, ‘life’ means Christ; hence, dying is so much gain” (Phil 1:21). I give You My present and my future. Promise: “The Son of Man has come to search out and save what was lost. “—Lk 19:10 Praise: St. Elizabeth, queen of Hungary, loved the sick and so built a hospital at the foot of her castle.   (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 16th & Among Our Greatest Needs

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

Have you ever encountered a special moment of grace, a once in a life-time opportunity you knew you could not pass up? Such a moment came for a blind and destitute man who heard that Jesus was passing by. The Gospel of Mark identifies this man as Bartimaeus (Mark 10:46-52). This blind man was determined to get near the one person who could meet his need. He knew who Jesus was and had heard of his fame for healing, but until now had no means of making contact with the Son of David, a clear reference and title for the Messiah.

Faith and persistence is rewarded
It took raw courage and bold persistence for Bartimaeus to get the attention of Jesus over the din of a noisy throng who crowded around Jesus as he made his way out of town. Why was the crowd annoyed with the blind man’s persistent shouts? He was disturbing their peace and interrupting their conversation with Jesus. It was common for a rabbi to teach as he walked with others. Jesus was on his way to celebrate the Passover in Jerusalem and a band of pilgrims followed him. When the crowd tried to silence the blind man he overpowered them with his loud emotional outburst and thus caught the attention of Jesus.

This incident reveals something important about how God interacts with us. The blind man was determined to get Jesus’ attention and he was persistent in the face of opposition. Jesus could have ignored or scolded him because he was interrupting his talk and disturbing his audience. Jesus showed that acting was more important than talking. This man was in desparate need and Jesus was ready not only to empathize with his suffering but to relieve it as well.

The blind man recognized Jesus with eyes of faith
A great speaker can command attention and respect, but a man or woman with a helping hand and a big heart is loved more. Jesus commends Bartimaeus for recognizing who he is with the eyes of faith and grants him physical sight as well. Do you recognize your need for God’s healing grace and do you seek Jesus out, like Bartimaeus, with persistent faith and trust in his goodness and mercy?

Bartimaeus was not only grateful for the gift of faith and the gift of physical sight, but for the opportunity to now follow Jesus as one of his disciples. Luke tells us us that he immediately followed Jesus and gave glory to God. The crowd also gave praise to God when they saw this double miracle of spiritual and physical vision. Cyril of Alexandria, a 5th century church father, comments on this double vision:

Now that he was delivered from his blindness, did he neglect the duty of loving Christ? He certainly did not. It says, “He followed him, offering him glory like to God.” He was set free from double blindness. Not only did he escape from the blindness of the body but also from that of the mind and heart. He would not have glorified him as God, had he not possessed spiritual vision. He became the means of others giving Christ glory, for it says that all the people gave glory to God.(Commentary on Luke,Homily 126)

Do you give glory to God for giving you the “eyes of faith” to recognize him as your Lord and Healer?

“Lord Jesus, open the eyes of my heart and mind that I may see and understand the truth and goodness of your word. May I never fail to recognize your presence with me and to call upon your saving grace in my time of need and healing.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

AMONG OUR GREATEST NEEDS

“A blind man sat at the side of the road begging. Hearing a crowd go by the man asked, ‘What is that?’ The answer came that Jesus of Nazareth was passing by.” —Luke 18:35-37

Imagine if you were color-blind and nearsighted with impaired peripheral vision. Could you see? Yes. Would you need healing of your vision? Absolutely. Likewise, we can see spiritually but “we see indistinctly, as in a mirror” (1 Cor 13:12). We should not let the fact that we have some vision keep us from crying out to Jesus for vision good enough to live His abundant life.

If we don’t see God better in our spouse, what chance do we have to persevere in our wedding vows? If we don’t see more deeply into God’s plan, will we ever stop abortion? Until we see with the eyes of our hearts (Eph 1:18) our eucharistic Lord under the appearances of bread and wine, we will not center our lives to be in communion and go to Communion. This is severe self-deprivation.

Some of us have spent thousands of dollars so that we can see better physically. We have glasses, sunglasses, reading glasses, bifocals, trifocals, contacts, eye drops, and laser surgery to improve our sight physically. It is much more important to see better spiritually. Consequently, cry out to Jesus “all the more, ‘Son of David, have pity on me!’ ” (Lk 18:39) Pray to Jesus: “Lord, I want to see” (see Lk 18:41).

Prayer: Father, may I follow Your orders exactly so that I will see rightly. Promise: “Though the snares of the wicked are twined about me Your law I have not forgotten.” —Ps 119:61 Praise: St. Margaret chose marriage over entering the convent and converted a kingdom.
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 15th & The End Of The End

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

Do you recognize the signs of God’s kingdom – signs that point to his power and action in our lives and in the world around us? The Lord Jesus came to bring us the kingdom of God and to set us free from bondage to sin, death, and destruction and from the powers of the evil one who tempts us through lies and deception.

The Lord is preparing us for his return
Jesus told his first disciples that it was for their benefit that he return to his Father in heaven in order for the Holy Spirit to come (John 16:7) and fill the earth with the fire of God’s love, truth, and glory. The Lord Jesus in every age fills his people with the power of the Holy Spirit so that each one of us can hear his voice, understand his truth, and sow the seeds of his word – the good news of the Gospel – wherever he sends us. The Lord Jesus is preparing his people for his return – for the day of “tribulation” and “shaking” when he will appear “coming in clouds with great power and glory” (Mark 13:25-26).

What did Jesus mean when he spoke about a time of tribulation, shaking, and the “Son of man coming with great power and glory”? The title Jesus most frequently used to describe his mission was the “Son of Man” (Mark 13:26). This title is a direct reference to the prophetic vision in the Book of Daniel, chapter 7:

13  I saw in the night visions, and behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a son of man, and he came to the Ancient of Days and was presented before him. 14 And to him was given dominion and glory and kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed.

The image of a “Son of man coming with the clouds of heaven” is taken from the vision of the prophet Daniel (Daniel 7:13-14). Daniel’s vision is a royal investiture of a human king before God’s throne. This king, whose authority comes from God, is given power to rule over “all peoples, nations, and languages” (Daniel 7:14). The kingdom which he comes to establish cannot be broken or destroyed because it is built on the foundation of God’s justice, truth, and holiness.

The day of the Lord’s return will be unlike any other moment in time, history, and destiny for the human race and our place in God’s creation. Then the “stars of heaven will fall and all will be shaken” before the presence of the Lord when he comes. Then the peoples of the earth and their rulers will know who is the true King and Ruler over all.

Jesus’ first coming was a rescue mission – to free the human race from slavery to sin and Satan – the father of lies. His second coming will be the final completion of his mission when he will “make all things new” – a new heavens and a new earth – after he has put down the last enemy which is death and restores our lowly bodies to immortality when death will be no more (Daniel 12:2-3).

The sign of the budding fig tree
What lesson does the Lord Jesus want us to learn from the parable of the budding fig tree? The fig tree was a common and important source of food for the Jews. It bore fruit twice a year, in the autumn and in the early spring. The prophet Joel mentions its fruit-bearing as a sign of favor from the Lord (Joel 2:22). The Talmud (a Jewish commentary and instruction on the Torah or Five Books of Moses) said that the first fruit came the day after Passover. The Jews believed that when the Messiah came he would usher in the kingdom of God at Passover time.

This parable foretells the joy of God’s kingdom – the joy of new life and the promise of a new age of peace and blessing. The signs of spring are evident for all who can see. Just so are the signs of God’s kingdom. The “budding” of God’s kingdom begins first in the hearts of those who are receptive to God’s word. Those who trust in God’s word will bear the fruits of his kingdom. And what are the fruits of that kingdom? “The kingdom of God ..is righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit (Romans 14:17).

The first-fruits of the kingdom in our present lives
The first coming of the Lord Jesus is inseparably linked with his second coming at the end of this present age. We do not know the day or hour when the Lord will return again in glory. But now in this present age we can experience the first-fruits of the kingdom of God – the abundant new life in the Holy Spirit who dwells within us, and the fruits of the Spirit – love, peace, joy, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control (Galatians 5:22-23) and so many other qualities which the Spirit works within us – thus enabling us to love and serve others with tenderhearted mercy, patience, and goodness. Do you know and experience in your life the first-fruits of the kingdom of God?

“Lord Jesus, fill me with your Holy Spirit that I may radiate the joy of your kingdom and the fire of your love to all I meet and serve. Direct my life to the glory of your name and to the coming of your kingdom.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

 

THE END OF THE END

“When you see these things happening, you will know that He is near, even at the door.” —Mark 13:29

Immediately before the end of the world, we will have “trials of every sort” (Mk 13:24). “It shall be a time unsurpassed in distress since nations began until that time” (Dn 12:1). “Indeed, had the Lord not shortened the period, not a person would be saved. But for the sake of those He has chosen, He has shortened the days” (Mk 13:20).

We will see a mass apostasy from our Christian faith, as the “man of lawlessness,” the Anti-Christ, is revealed (2 Thes 2:3). “Because of the increase of evil, the love of most will grow cold. The man who holds out to the end, however, is the one who will see salvation” (Mt 24:12-13). “At that time there shall arise Michael, the great prince, guardian of your people; it shall be a time unsurpassed in distress since nations began until that time. At that time your people shall escape, everyone who is found written in the book” (Dn 12:1). “Some shall live forever, others shall be an everlasting horror and disgrace. But the wise shall shine brightly like the splendor of the firmament, and those who lead the many to justice shall be like the stars forever” (Dn 12:2-3). All of these things are certain and true, for Jesus has promised: “The heavens and the earth will pass away but My words will not pass” (Mk 13:31).

Repent! Live for Jesus alone! Lift up your eyes to see Jesus “coming in the clouds with great power and glory” (Mk 13:26). Maranatha! “Come, Lord Jesus!” (Rv 22:20)

Prayer: Father, I want to be ready. Promise: “Jesus offered one sacrifice for sins and took His seat forever at the right hand of God; now He waits until His enemies are placed beneath His feet.” —Heb 10:12-13 Praise: Praise the risen Jesus, Who will come again in glory!
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Nov 14th & Fast Answers To Prayer

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net 

What can a shameless and unjust judge pitted against a crusty and pestering woman teach us about justice and vindication in the kingdom of God? Jesus tells a story that is all too true – a defenseless widow is taken advantaged of and refused her rights. Through sheer persistence she wears down an unscrupulous judge until he gives her justice. Persistence pays off, and that’s especially true for those who trust in God. Jesus illustrates how God as our Judge and Vindicator is much quicker to come to our defense and to bring us his justice, blessing, and help when we need it. But we can easily lose heart and forget to ask our heavenly Father for his grace and help.

Faith-filled persistence reaps the fruit of justiceand grace
Jesus told the parable of the persistent widow and the unjust judge (Luke 18:1-8) to give his disciples fresh hope and confidence in God’s unfailing care and favor towards us (grace). In this present life we can expect trials and adversity, but we are not without hope in God. The Day of the Last Judgment will reveal that God’s justice triumphs over all the injustices perpetrated by a fallen world of sinful people and that God’s love is stronger than death (Song of Songs 8:6). Those who put their faith in God and entrust their lives to him can look forward with hope and confident assurance. They will receive their reward – if not fully in this present life then surely and completely in the age to come in God’s kingdom of righteousness, peace, and joy (Romans 14:17).

Jesus ends his parable with a probing question for us. Will you and I have faith – the kind of faith that doesn’t give up or lose hope in God – but perseveres to the end of our lives – and to the end of this present age when the Lord Jesus will return in glory as Ruler and Judge of All? Faith is an entirely free gift that God makes to us. We could not believe, trust, and persevere with hope if God did not first draw us to himself and reveal to us his merciful love and care. If we want to grow and persevere in faith until the end of our days, then we must nourish our faith with the word of God and ask the Lord to increase it (Luke 17:5). When trials and setbacks disappoint you, where do you place your hope and confidence? Do you pray with expectant faith and confident hope in God’s merciful care and provision for you?

“Lord Jesus, increase my faith and make it strong that I may never doubt your word and promise to be with me always. In every situation I face – whether trials, setbacks, or loss – may I always find strength in your unfailing love and find joy and contentment in having you alone as the treasure of my heart.”

 

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

FAST ANSWERS TO PRAYER

“I tell you, He will give them swift justice.” —Luke 18:8

There’s a certain kind of prayer that results in “swift justice.” God will not delay long over us when we pray in this way (Lk 18:7). In this way of prayer, we call out to God “day and night” (Lk 18:7) and realize that at all times, even at the best of times, we are in desperate need of God. In this prayer, we cry out: “Save us by Your power, and help me, who am alone and have no one but You, O Lord” (Est C:25). We pray with the psalmist: “Out of the depths I cry to You, O Lord; Lord, hear my voice!” (Ps 130:1) We pray as Jesus prayed in the garden of Gethsemani (Mk 14:32ff). When we pray in this way, we understand “the necessity of praying always and not losing heart” (Lk 18:1).

It takes faith to face head on the terrible condition of our world and our desperate need for God. However, when we pray in faith, aware of our total dependence on God, and call out to the Lord day and night, God’s “all-powerful Word from heaven’s royal throne” will bound into our doomed land (Wis 18:15). The Lord will save us. He will intervene, break through, and set us free.

Will anyone pray the prayer of necessity and faith? “When the Son of Man comes, will He find any faith on the earth?” (Lk 18:8)

Prayer: Father, “increase our faith” (Lk 17:5). Promise: “They ranged about like horses, and bounded about like lambs, praising You, O Lord! their Deliverer.” —Wis 19:9 Praise: When their home was invaded, the Gomez family prayed and the would-be burglars fled.
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 20, 2015.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements